Tablets to keep tabs on crooks

Exclusive: Tablets to keep tabs on crooks

HANDHELD DEVICES: The Tetratabs tablets are already being piloted by Warwickshire Police, which bought a batch of 60.

HANDHELD DEVICES: The Tetratabs tablets are already being piloted by Warwickshire Police, which bought a batch of 60.

HANDHELD DEVICES: The Tetratabs tablets are already being piloted by Warwickshire Police, which bought a batch of 60.

First published in News
Last updated
Evesham Journal: Tom Edwards Exclusive by , Political Reporter

FRONT line police officers across Worcestershire are to be handed tablet devices to allow them more time to pound the streets.

West Mercia Police is aiming to compensate for closing police posts and cutting the number of officers by handing out Tetratabs tablets, similar to an Apple iPad.

The devices, which were launched in 2006, are already being piloted by Warwickshire Police, which bought a batch of 60 for front line officers to try last year.

They come with in-built 3G internet, Wi-Fi, Bluetooth and hardware so police can effectively work on the beat.

Barrie Sheldon, West Mercia’s deputy police and crime commissioner, said it would result in constables “staying outside for longer” and could potentially speed up response times.

All PCs on active patrol in West Mercia will get the devices from September and will be expected to complete paperwork whilst out and about instead of driving to the nearest station.

The move comes as the force looks at axeing 11 police bases completely and relocates up to another 20 as part of a money-saving plan.

Mr Sheldon said a few officers in West Mercia had already trialled the devices having been loaned them by the company for free.

The force has yet to reveal the cost, or how many devices are being purchased for the full roll-out.

Tetratab has told your Worcester News the deal is still under negotiation.

Mr Sheldon said: “There is a pilot taking place where some police constables have been given these devices.

“Many people probably don’t realise just how much time front line officers have to spend inside buildings doing paperwork.

“This means they can stay outside for longer and don’t have to visit a police station - our plan is for all front line officers to have one.

“This is something we’ve talked about for some time and the timing is definitely right to be doing it now.”

In February West Mercia Police revealed proposals to shut 11 bases completely, including Worcester’s Guildhall office as well as sites Broadway, Wythall and Redditch to save £1.5 million.

Another 20 will be relocated to alternative locations including the office at Cranham Drive in Warndon and buildings in Pershore, Droitwich and Tenbury.

Mr Sheldon said talks are still ongoing about the future of many sites.

“We’ve had a lot of feedback over each one during the public consultations and a report is currently sat at the chief constable’s desk,” he said.

“I am confident there will be some changes and a revised plan will soon be published.”

As your Worcester News revealed in January 140 police officer jobs have also been scrapped.

Mr Sheldon said the new number of 2,025 current officers will now be maintained to 2017, but PCSOs will be reduced from 250 to 235.

Around 10 forces around the country are using Tetratab devices, while a handful of the rest have tried iPads in recent months.

But the Tetratabs are gaining popularity because they have extra special security and are aimed at customers who buy them in bulk rather than single purchases.

Councillor Jabba Riaz, Worcester City Council’s cabinet member for safer and stronger communities, said: “Anything that saves time and keeps them on the front line would be welcomed.”

A statement from West Mercia Police said: "With strong leadership, the effective use of mobile data technology has the power to transform policing services - especially in these times of austerity when it is imperative the public sector emrabces change and uses technology to its advantage."

It also said the devices used in the pilot were loaned for free, costing the public nothing.

Comments (27)

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8:00am Wed 24 Apr 13

jb says...

Keeping officers out and about is what most people I would imagine want to see but I wonder if this will mean finding officers parked up in patrol cars engrossed in their paperwork. They still have to do the work they're just being pushed out of the police stations in effect. Technology does help but wouldn't reducing the amount of paperwork also be useful?
Keeping officers out and about is what most people I would imagine want to see but I wonder if this will mean finding officers parked up in patrol cars engrossed in their paperwork. They still have to do the work they're just being pushed out of the police stations in effect. Technology does help but wouldn't reducing the amount of paperwork also be useful? jb
  • Score: 0

9:54am Wed 24 Apr 13

RogerLFC says...

I'm typing this reply on an ipad. Very handy for a short reply on a forum or Twitter but not at all practical for writing a statement whilst sheltered in a shop doorway ... Not convinced these devices will achieve much to be honest ...
I'm typing this reply on an ipad. Very handy for a short reply on a forum or Twitter but not at all practical for writing a statement whilst sheltered in a shop doorway ... Not convinced these devices will achieve much to be honest ... RogerLFC
  • Score: 1

10:04am Wed 24 Apr 13

More Tea Vicar says...

In most lines of business where staff are mobile, IT has made a huge difference, reducing paperwork and speeding up processes, allowing better access to info.

Used correctly and intelligently, this initiative should be very useful, by avoiding or reducing trips back to the station.
In most lines of business where staff are mobile, IT has made a huge difference, reducing paperwork and speeding up processes, allowing better access to info. Used correctly and intelligently, this initiative should be very useful, by avoiding or reducing trips back to the station. More Tea Vicar
  • Score: 0

10:25am Wed 24 Apr 13

square1 says...

All PCs on active patrol in West Mercia will get the devices from September and will be expected to complete paperwork whilst out and about instead of driving to the nearest station.

How dies this fit in round the health and safety aspect regarding computer use. Surely anyone using a computer have to have appropriate seating etc... I wouldn't facing being squeezed into a tiny astra having to type away on a computer.
All PCs on active patrol in West Mercia will get the devices from September and will be expected to complete paperwork whilst out and about instead of driving to the nearest station. How dies this fit in round the health and safety aspect regarding computer use. Surely anyone using a computer have to have appropriate seating etc... I wouldn't facing being squeezed into a tiny astra having to type away on a computer. square1
  • Score: 1

10:42am Wed 24 Apr 13

Arthur Blenkinsop says...

Just a thought - I wonder how long it will be before some 'orrible little oik grabs one from an officer and runs off with it!
Just a thought - I wonder how long it will be before some 'orrible little oik grabs one from an officer and runs off with it! Arthur Blenkinsop
  • Score: 0

11:11am Wed 24 Apr 13

DanMacc says...

This is a good way for reports to be altered after the fact to fit the police officers view. I thought the whole point of paper notes was that they couldn't be faked/changed at a later date?
This is a good way for reports to be altered after the fact to fit the police officers view. I thought the whole point of paper notes was that they couldn't be faked/changed at a later date? DanMacc
  • Score: 1

11:46am Wed 24 Apr 13

CJH says...

DanMacc wrote:
This is a good way for reports to be altered after the fact to fit the police officers view. I thought the whole point of paper notes was that they couldn't be faked/changed at a later date?
That's a very naive sweeping statement isn't it? The 'whole point' of paper notes was that it was the only format available! You know it's 2013 now, don't you? 'Fact altering' went on before computers were around (in all walks of life). Now, changes to text can be tracked if necessary and uploaded straight to a central server. Not always perfect, but I know which I would prefer. And the notes are available immediately, and to more than one officer, not sitting in someone's notebook waiting to be typed up. God knows the police take enough flak, anything which helps them has to be an improvement.
[quote][p][bold]DanMacc[/bold] wrote: This is a good way for reports to be altered after the fact to fit the police officers view. I thought the whole point of paper notes was that they couldn't be faked/changed at a later date?[/p][/quote]That's a very naive sweeping statement isn't it? The 'whole point' of paper notes was that it was the only format available! You know it's 2013 now, don't you? 'Fact altering' went on before computers were around (in all walks of life). Now, changes to text can be tracked if necessary and uploaded straight to a central server. Not always perfect, but I know which I would prefer. And the notes are available immediately, and to more than one officer, not sitting in someone's notebook waiting to be typed up. God knows the police take enough flak, anything which helps them has to be an improvement. CJH
  • Score: -1

11:54am Wed 24 Apr 13

CJH says...

square1 wrote:
All PCs on active patrol in West Mercia will get the devices from September and will be expected to complete paperwork whilst out and about instead of driving to the nearest station.

How dies this fit in round the health and safety aspect regarding computer use. Surely anyone using a computer have to have appropriate seating etc... I wouldn't facing being squeezed into a tiny astra having to type away on a computer.
It's a tablet, not a flipping great desktop. They already have computers in their cars anyway. It's what they need to do their job. Why do people look for problems all the time? If the police (and they have 'elf and safety and unions) don't think it's a problem, why should you? Are you a police officer?
[quote][p][bold]square1[/bold] wrote: All PCs on active patrol in West Mercia will get the devices from September and will be expected to complete paperwork whilst out and about instead of driving to the nearest station. How dies this fit in round the health and safety aspect regarding computer use. Surely anyone using a computer have to have appropriate seating etc... I wouldn't facing being squeezed into a tiny astra having to type away on a computer.[/p][/quote]It's a tablet, not a flipping great desktop. They already have computers in their cars anyway. It's what they need to do their job. Why do people look for problems all the time? If the police (and they have 'elf and safety and unions) don't think it's a problem, why should you? Are you a police officer? CJH
  • Score: -1

12:27pm Wed 24 Apr 13

Letterman says...

The theory is sound, but what about when officers end up in areas with no WiFi access? They'll have to use 3G which can be slow and unreliable, depending on signal strength, while the tariffs that enable 3G connections, which need to be unlimited, may cost a lot per month. And can we trust officers not to be sat in their cars, using their tablets to play games on etc rather than being on the beat.
The theory is sound, but what about when officers end up in areas with no WiFi access? They'll have to use 3G which can be slow and unreliable, depending on signal strength, while the tariffs that enable 3G connections, which need to be unlimited, may cost a lot per month. And can we trust officers not to be sat in their cars, using their tablets to play games on etc rather than being on the beat. Letterman
  • Score: 1

12:34pm Wed 24 Apr 13

CJH says...

Letterman wrote:
The theory is sound, but what about when officers end up in areas with no WiFi access? They'll have to use 3G which can be slow and unreliable, depending on signal strength, while the tariffs that enable 3G connections, which need to be unlimited, may cost a lot per month. And can we trust officers not to be sat in their cars, using their tablets to play games on etc rather than being on the beat.
"And can we trust officers not to be sat in their cars, using their tablets to play games on etc rather than being on the beat" What a sad and pointless comment.
[quote][p][bold]Letterman[/bold] wrote: The theory is sound, but what about when officers end up in areas with no WiFi access? They'll have to use 3G which can be slow and unreliable, depending on signal strength, while the tariffs that enable 3G connections, which need to be unlimited, may cost a lot per month. And can we trust officers not to be sat in their cars, using their tablets to play games on etc rather than being on the beat.[/p][/quote]"And can we trust officers not to be sat in their cars, using their tablets to play games on etc rather than being on the beat" What a sad and pointless comment. CJH
  • Score: -1

12:46pm Wed 24 Apr 13

More Tea Vicar says...

CJH wrote:
square1 wrote:
All PCs on active patrol in West Mercia will get the devices from September and will be expected to complete paperwork whilst out and about instead of driving to the nearest station.

How dies this fit in round the health and safety aspect regarding computer use. Surely anyone using a computer have to have appropriate seating etc... I wouldn't facing being squeezed into a tiny astra having to type away on a computer.
It's a tablet, not a flipping great desktop. They already have computers in their cars anyway. It's what they need to do their job. Why do people look for problems all the time? If the police (and they have 'elf and safety and unions) don't think it's a problem, why should you? Are you a police officer?
To me, it's a sensible use of technology, so long as the details are got right.

There are valid concerns about implementation, obviously - there have been more than enough horror stories about the police for it to be clear that there are issues which need addressing.

But really, without this technology, the police are operating like field sales people did before the 'mobile revolution', carrying around tons of customer and product details on paper, communicating by letter or fax...

Times have moved on. The police should move with them. So long as they don't start claiming compo for elbow or finger injuries etc...
[quote][p][bold]CJH[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]square1[/bold] wrote: All PCs on active patrol in West Mercia will get the devices from September and will be expected to complete paperwork whilst out and about instead of driving to the nearest station. How dies this fit in round the health and safety aspect regarding computer use. Surely anyone using a computer have to have appropriate seating etc... I wouldn't facing being squeezed into a tiny astra having to type away on a computer.[/p][/quote]It's a tablet, not a flipping great desktop. They already have computers in their cars anyway. It's what they need to do their job. Why do people look for problems all the time? If the police (and they have 'elf and safety and unions) don't think it's a problem, why should you? Are you a police officer?[/p][/quote]To me, it's a sensible use of technology, so long as the details are got right. There are valid concerns about implementation, obviously - there have been more than enough horror stories about the police for it to be clear that there are issues which need addressing. But really, without this technology, the police are operating like field sales people did before the 'mobile revolution', carrying around tons of customer and product details on paper, communicating by letter or fax... Times have moved on. The police should move with them. So long as they don't start claiming compo for elbow or finger injuries etc... More Tea Vicar
  • Score: 0

12:48pm Wed 24 Apr 13

DanMacc says...

CJH wrote:
Letterman wrote:
The theory is sound, but what about when officers end up in areas with no WiFi access? They'll have to use 3G which can be slow and unreliable, depending on signal strength, while the tariffs that enable 3G connections, which need to be unlimited, may cost a lot per month. And can we trust officers not to be sat in their cars, using their tablets to play games on etc rather than being on the beat.
"And can we trust officers not to be sat in their cars, using their tablets to play games on etc rather than being on the beat" What a sad and pointless comment.
CJH, you have obviously never played Candy Crush.
[quote][p][bold]CJH[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Letterman[/bold] wrote: The theory is sound, but what about when officers end up in areas with no WiFi access? They'll have to use 3G which can be slow and unreliable, depending on signal strength, while the tariffs that enable 3G connections, which need to be unlimited, may cost a lot per month. And can we trust officers not to be sat in their cars, using their tablets to play games on etc rather than being on the beat.[/p][/quote]"And can we trust officers not to be sat in their cars, using their tablets to play games on etc rather than being on the beat" What a sad and pointless comment.[/p][/quote]CJH, you have obviously never played Candy Crush. DanMacc
  • Score: 0

12:50pm Wed 24 Apr 13

unpc says...

Hmm, Squeezed into an Astra with a laptop balanced on their knees instead of popping back into the local nick (oh sorry I forgot, they're closing them all!). Tha'ts really going to save time & money! The cost of the Laptops, the 3G bill, the extra time to actually type up the reports on a tiny keyboard & screen.... I think the PCC needs a new calculator if he thinks this is money saving. Keep the stations open rather than spend money on toys.
Hmm, Squeezed into an Astra with a laptop balanced on their knees instead of popping back into the local nick (oh sorry I forgot, they're closing them all!). Tha'ts really going to save time & money! The cost of the Laptops, the 3G bill, the extra time to actually type up the reports on a tiny keyboard & screen.... I think the PCC needs a new calculator if he thinks this is money saving. Keep the stations open rather than spend money on toys. unpc
  • Score: 1

1:06pm Wed 24 Apr 13

More Tea Vicar says...

unpc wrote:
Hmm, Squeezed into an Astra with a laptop balanced on their knees instead of popping back into the local nick (oh sorry I forgot, they're closing them all!). Tha'ts really going to save time & money! The cost of the Laptops, the 3G bill, the extra time to actually type up the reports on a tiny keyboard & screen.... I think the PCC needs a new calculator if he thinks this is money saving. Keep the stations open rather than spend money on toys.
It's not a laptop, it's a tablet, and they are easy to use in the car. Compared to the current set up, where they go back to stations, it has to be a better option.

You'd have to have a pretty bad mobile tarif to end up paying more on that than you do on keeping a building open.
[quote][p][bold]unpc[/bold] wrote: Hmm, Squeezed into an Astra with a laptop balanced on their knees instead of popping back into the local nick (oh sorry I forgot, they're closing them all!). Tha'ts really going to save time & money! The cost of the Laptops, the 3G bill, the extra time to actually type up the reports on a tiny keyboard & screen.... I think the PCC needs a new calculator if he thinks this is money saving. Keep the stations open rather than spend money on toys.[/p][/quote]It's not a laptop, it's a tablet, and they are easy to use in the car. Compared to the current set up, where they go back to stations, it has to be a better option. You'd have to have a pretty bad mobile tarif to end up paying more on that than you do on keeping a building open. More Tea Vicar
  • Score: -1

5:14pm Wed 24 Apr 13

TDH123 says...

What do you do with it when pursuing an offender? What assessment has been conducted regarding the safe use of the device? Give it a few months there will be officers with stiff necks, aching wrists and a plethora of offenders who have not been detained for through fear by the officer of damaging their tetrapad!
What do you do with it when pursuing an offender? What assessment has been conducted regarding the safe use of the device? Give it a few months there will be officers with stiff necks, aching wrists and a plethora of offenders who have not been detained for through fear by the officer of damaging their tetrapad! TDH123
  • Score: 1

5:59pm Wed 24 Apr 13

pinkfluff says...

DanMacc wrote:
CJH wrote:
Letterman wrote:
The theory is sound, but what about when officers end up in areas with no WiFi access? They'll have to use 3G which can be slow and unreliable, depending on signal strength, while the tariffs that enable 3G connections, which need to be unlimited, may cost a lot per month. And can we trust officers not to be sat in their cars, using their tablets to play games on etc rather than being on the beat.
"And can we trust officers not to be sat in their cars, using their tablets to play games on etc rather than being on the beat" What a sad and pointless comment.
CJH, you have obviously never played Candy Crush.
lol
[quote][p][bold]DanMacc[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]CJH[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Letterman[/bold] wrote: The theory is sound, but what about when officers end up in areas with no WiFi access? They'll have to use 3G which can be slow and unreliable, depending on signal strength, while the tariffs that enable 3G connections, which need to be unlimited, may cost a lot per month. And can we trust officers not to be sat in their cars, using their tablets to play games on etc rather than being on the beat.[/p][/quote]"And can we trust officers not to be sat in their cars, using their tablets to play games on etc rather than being on the beat" What a sad and pointless comment.[/p][/quote]CJH, you have obviously never played Candy Crush.[/p][/quote]lol pinkfluff
  • Score: 0

6:03pm Wed 24 Apr 13

pinkfluff says...

Personally I believe it's the way forward. Yes I am sure there will be a few teething troubles....as with any new system.

Were do all the "glass half empty" folk come from? Give something a chance before you all jump on it to rip it apart you crazy kids.
Personally I believe it's the way forward. Yes I am sure there will be a few teething troubles....as with any new system. Were do all the "glass half empty" folk come from? Give something a chance before you all jump on it to rip it apart you crazy kids. pinkfluff
  • Score: -1

6:06pm Wed 24 Apr 13

CJH says...

TDH123 wrote:
What do you do with it when pursuing an offender? What assessment has been conducted regarding the safe use of the device? Give it a few months there will be officers with stiff necks, aching wrists and a plethora of offenders who have not been detained for through fear by the officer of damaging their tetrapad!
"What assessment has been conducted regarding the safe use of the device?" Hilarious comment! It's ok for the police to cope with violent drunks, knife wielding criminals, dangerous drivers and other low life scum, but go careful with that tablet now! Some major neo-luddites have come out of the woodwork today!
.
Criminals use technology! The police should at least have the same chance.
[quote][p][bold]TDH123[/bold] wrote: What do you do with it when pursuing an offender? What assessment has been conducted regarding the safe use of the device? Give it a few months there will be officers with stiff necks, aching wrists and a plethora of offenders who have not been detained for through fear by the officer of damaging their tetrapad![/p][/quote]"What assessment has been conducted regarding the safe use of the device?" Hilarious comment! It's ok for the police to cope with violent drunks, knife wielding criminals, dangerous drivers and other low life scum, but go careful with that tablet now! Some major neo-luddites have come out of the woodwork today! . Criminals use technology! The police should at least have the same chance. CJH
  • Score: -1

6:14pm Wed 24 Apr 13

Maggie Would says...

Arthur Blenkinsop wrote:
Just a thought - I wonder how long it will be before some 'orrible little oik grabs one from an officer and runs off with it!
In the greater part, these tablets are not attractive to a thief - they are ugly items of kit with just the software that's needed loaded on. If you look at the tablets used by supermarket home delivery pickers, couriers and electricity meter readers, this is what we are talking about.
The article mentions iphones, but I wouldn't expect them to last for long, they are hardly robust.
[quote][p][bold]Arthur Blenkinsop[/bold] wrote: Just a thought - I wonder how long it will be before some 'orrible little oik grabs one from an officer and runs off with it![/p][/quote]In the greater part, these tablets are not attractive to a thief - they are ugly items of kit with just the software that's needed loaded on. If you look at the tablets used by supermarket home delivery pickers, couriers and electricity meter readers, this is what we are talking about. The article mentions iphones, but I wouldn't expect them to last for long, they are hardly robust. Maggie Would
  • Score: 1

6:50pm Wed 24 Apr 13

TDH123 says...

CJH wrote:
TDH123 wrote:
What do you do with it when pursuing an offender? What assessment has been conducted regarding the safe use of the device? Give it a few months there will be officers with stiff necks, aching wrists and a plethora of offenders who have not been detained for through fear by the officer of damaging their tetrapad!
"What assessment has been conducted regarding the safe use of the device?" Hilarious comment! It's ok for the police to cope with violent drunks, knife wielding criminals, dangerous drivers and other low life scum, but go careful with that tablet now! Some major neo-luddites have come out of the woodwork today!
.
Criminals use technology! The police should at least have the same chance.
Actually there have been health and safety assessments of all of the matters you raise. Hence the reason why officers now wear stab-vests, carry spray and have appropriate protocols in place which are followed during pursuits. I concur that some criminals have access to and indeed utilise technology. What I am unclear about is why giving an officer a tetratab will some how put them on an equal footing with IT literate criminals.
[quote][p][bold]CJH[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]TDH123[/bold] wrote: What do you do with it when pursuing an offender? What assessment has been conducted regarding the safe use of the device? Give it a few months there will be officers with stiff necks, aching wrists and a plethora of offenders who have not been detained for through fear by the officer of damaging their tetrapad![/p][/quote]"What assessment has been conducted regarding the safe use of the device?" Hilarious comment! It's ok for the police to cope with violent drunks, knife wielding criminals, dangerous drivers and other low life scum, but go careful with that tablet now! Some major neo-luddites have come out of the woodwork today! . Criminals use technology! The police should at least have the same chance.[/p][/quote]Actually there have been health and safety assessments of all of the matters you raise. Hence the reason why officers now wear stab-vests, carry spray and have appropriate protocols in place which are followed during pursuits. I concur that some criminals have access to and indeed utilise technology. What I am unclear about is why giving an officer a tetratab will some how put them on an equal footing with IT literate criminals. TDH123
  • Score: 1

9:36pm Wed 24 Apr 13

grumpy woman says...

I wonder about data protection issues. Anyone can wander past and read a tablet.
I wonder about data protection issues. Anyone can wander past and read a tablet. grumpy woman
  • Score: 0

11:33pm Wed 24 Apr 13

CJH says...

grumpy woman wrote:
I wonder about data protection issues. Anyone can wander past and read a tablet.
'Anyone can wander past and read a tablet'? You're really scraping the bottom of the barrel now for reasons against this scheme.
[quote][p][bold]grumpy woman[/bold] wrote: I wonder about data protection issues. Anyone can wander past and read a tablet.[/p][/quote]'Anyone can wander past and read a tablet'? You're really scraping the bottom of the barrel now for reasons against this scheme. CJH
  • Score: -1

8:16am Thu 25 Apr 13

Respectable says...

A lot of naive comments about IT , Tablets and Police work.

For gawds sake can we credit the force with knowing what they are doing in terms of H&S Risk Assessments, IT Security and trying to improve actual man / woman hours on the beat..

I don't imagine there isn't a Chief Constable in the land that wouldn't like a 1000 more officers and a station in every town and village.. Fact is budgets don't allow for it so they have to look at new ways of Policing. I'm sure this is an extended trial and will be evaluated after a period of time for success or failure.

Seems like some people have nothing better to do than criticise.
A lot of naive comments about IT , Tablets and Police work. For gawds sake can we credit the force with knowing what they are doing in terms of H&S Risk Assessments, IT Security and trying to improve actual man / woman hours on the beat.. I don't imagine there isn't a Chief Constable in the land that wouldn't like a 1000 more officers and a station in every town and village.. Fact is budgets don't allow for it so they have to look at new ways of Policing. I'm sure this is an extended trial and will be evaluated after a period of time for success or failure. Seems like some people have nothing better to do than criticise. Respectable
  • Score: -1

11:09am Thu 25 Apr 13

Vox populi says...

Not sure a police office might be as effective fighting that knife wielding manic with his cricked neck from working on his tablet………hilar
ious…
Why doesn’t anyone want a police force that moves with the times? Mobile working has been available for years.
Set it up correctly, lock down the games that people are worried about, put enough security on it so if anyone does nick it, it becomes a brick that can be tracked to its exact spot and criminal.
With 3g it will it has a number of other great uses – emergency response directly to where the officer is dealing with an incident or injury thus cutting response times.
Can measure both a PCs time at locations where they are at anytime and potentially give great crime analysis data quickly and efficiently: map patrol areas to ensure effective coverage, show exact locations of crimes, reveal patterns, show exactly how much time police spend on paperwork and address the problem etc.

A bit big brother? Data is power and useful if used correctly. All of the above is only asking police officers to do their jobs effectively which this has the power to assist with…. .
Not sure a police office might be as effective fighting that knife wielding manic with his cricked neck from working on his tablet………hilar ious… Why doesn’t anyone want a police force that moves with the times? Mobile working has been available for years. Set it up correctly, lock down the games that people are worried about, put enough security on it so if anyone does nick it, it becomes a brick that can be tracked to its exact spot and criminal. With 3g it will it has a number of other great uses – emergency response directly to where the officer is dealing with an incident or injury thus cutting response times. Can measure both a PCs time at locations where they are at anytime and potentially give great crime analysis data quickly and efficiently: map patrol areas to ensure effective coverage, show exact locations of crimes, reveal patterns, show exactly how much time police spend on paperwork and address the problem etc. A bit big brother? Data is power and useful if used correctly. All of the above is only asking police officers to do their jobs effectively which this has the power to assist with…. . Vox populi
  • Score: 0

12:09pm Thu 25 Apr 13

More Tea Vicar says...

pinkfluff wrote:
Personally I believe it's the way forward. Yes I am sure there will be a few teething troubles....as with any new system.

Were do all the "glass half empty" folk come from? Give something a chance before you all jump on it to rip it apart you crazy kids.
For once we agree. yee ha.
[quote][p][bold]pinkfluff[/bold] wrote: Personally I believe it's the way forward. Yes I am sure there will be a few teething troubles....as with any new system. Were do all the "glass half empty" folk come from? Give something a chance before you all jump on it to rip it apart you crazy kids.[/p][/quote]For once we agree. yee ha. More Tea Vicar
  • Score: 0

6:04pm Thu 25 Apr 13

b1ackb1rd says...

Hindlip Hall has been renamed New Leek Wootton ... If Warks officers went round with their pants on their heads WM would meekly follow.
Hindlip Hall has been renamed New Leek Wootton ... If Warks officers went round with their pants on their heads WM would meekly follow. b1ackb1rd
  • Score: 0

2:50am Fri 26 Apr 13

thompson9100 says...

Some people seen to miss the blindingly obvious and forget news from a few years back.

Tetra is the police radio system and can carry data. 3g on devices is likely a backup and part of a corporate virtual private network, that many corporations operate.

Unlike your consumer tablet and walkie-talkie, tetra devices can be killed.

Officers were forced into paper filling because the courts and cps liked that, but they are now taking stuff electronically, so computer notes, reports, etc are fine. Oh, and more the picture - the officer had a stylus so statements can be signed, much like signatures are taken electronically in custody now, if you pay attention to the various cop shows!

By the way, I wrote this all on my 5.3 inch Samsung Galaxy More with no problems at all while say relaxing on my sofa. Oh, and I'm registered blind too!
Some people seen to miss the blindingly obvious and forget news from a few years back. Tetra is the police radio system and can carry data. 3g on devices is likely a backup and part of a corporate virtual private network, that many corporations operate. Unlike your consumer tablet and walkie-talkie, tetra devices can be killed. Officers were forced into paper filling because the courts and cps liked that, but they are now taking stuff electronically, so computer notes, reports, etc are fine. Oh, and more the picture - the officer had a stylus so statements can be signed, much like signatures are taken electronically in custody now, if you pay attention to the various cop shows! By the way, I wrote this all on my 5.3 inch Samsung Galaxy More with no problems at all while say relaxing on my sofa. Oh, and I'm registered blind too! thompson9100
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