How will she cope if day centre shuts?

Evesham Journal: MOVE: Stephanie Welton, whose daughter Sarah attends the day care centre in Davies Road, with other parents and users worried about plans to transfer services to Pershore and Evesham library. MOVE: Stephanie Welton, whose daughter Sarah attends the day care centre in Davies Road, with other parents and users worried about plans to transfer services to Pershore and Evesham library.

PARENTS of disabled adults who attend a day care service in Evesham are worried about the impact on their children of a potential move to the town’s library.

Proposals are being discussed as part of a consultation between the parents and carers of service users at the centre in Davies Road, and the county council.

As part of the potential changes there will be a resource centre in Pershore for those with more complex learning disabilities and a community-based service for those needing less intensive support at Evesham Library.

These would replace the existing hub which is available between 9am and 3.30pm everyday, providing respite for carers.

There are 26 users and their carers who will be affected.

Michael and Stephanie Welton, are the parents of 40-year-old Sarah Welton, who lives with them in Offenham and has attended the centre for 15 years.

“I suggested they looked at alternatives because it may be the library doesn’t fulfil the needs of those people,” said Mr Welton. “The current centre is ideal – they have a garden, a kitchen and a Snoezelen [multisensory] area.

“With Sarah you only have to change one small thing and she can get quite upset. She loves it there.”

Brenda Stowe, of Pebworth, whose daughter Melanie, 50, has been going to the centre since she was 16, said: “They are trying to railroad us. We are all dead against it. The library isn’t very big and they need room and facilities.

Pershore is too far for Melanie to go. To us it’s like going back instead of going forward for disabled people.”

The parents of 50-year-old Martin Hopkins, Terry and Yvonne, of Broadway, were also concerned.

“He has been going there for 35 years,” said Mr Hopkins. “He worries and is bringing it up every day now. It would upset Martin a lot if they had to move. I can’t see the library working.”

Tony and Ann Horner, of Lower Moor, said their son Michael, 44, attends the centre four days a week. Mr Horner said: “Nobody seems to be able to tell us anything.

We are really being left in the dark. It is as if our children are a nuisance to society and it’s getting worse.”

Councillor Sheila Blagg, Worcestershire County Council's cabinet member for adult social care, said: “In line with the model of day opportunities currently in place, Worcestershire County Council are consulting on the location of services across the south of the county in order to find the most suitable locations.

“The county council need to ensure the best use of available resources whilst delivering good access to services. All service users will be having an individual assessment in conjunction with their carers to ensure we all understand what will best meet peoples’ needs.”

The consultation period ends next Friday.

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