Speed camera reminder for M5 users

Evesham Journal: Speed camera reminder for M5 users Speed camera reminder for M5 users

MOTORISTS travelling along the M5 north of Worcester are being reminded to watch their speed.

Roadworks are currently in place from Junction Six (Worcester North) to Junction 4a (Bromsgrove) while central barrier work is carried out.

The work is expected to last until September with a 50mph limit throughout the route in both directions.

The Safer Roads Partnership says speed enforcement in the area is taking place 24 hours a day by way of average speed cameras.

“Speed enforcement on this stretch of the M5 is necessary while roadworks are taking place," said Anna Higgins, communications manager at the Partnership.

"Our main concern and the reason why we are undertaking enforcement is to ensure that both motorists and road workers are kept safe.

"Enforcement is taking place 24 hours a day by average speed cameras. We are therefore urging all motorists to exercise caution as they travel through the area and comply with the speed limit, which is clearly marked.”

The Highways Agency says safety cameras "help minimise the risk faced by road workers".

Comments (17)

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9:16am Wed 12 Mar 14

MJI says...

Fair enough on road works but people forget they are average speed, then also forget that speedos are not that accurate,
.
I used to use average speed on trip computer and cruise and watched people accelerating after tha cameras with my speedo reading in the low mid 50s.
Fair enough on road works but people forget they are average speed, then also forget that speedos are not that accurate, . I used to use average speed on trip computer and cruise and watched people accelerating after tha cameras with my speedo reading in the low mid 50s. MJI
  • Score: 1

9:21am Wed 12 Mar 14

AlexHanley says...

“Speed enforcement on this stretch of the M5 is necessary while roadworks are taking place,"

Of course it is not., this is all about raising revenue for the deluded fools at the "safety partnership" that perpetuate this myth. It is not contraflow, they have just moved the lanes over for a few miles so lane 1 is now the hard shoulder. The workers are safely protected by a long barrier.

No other country in the world would impose such a limit for this type of work (I know that as I drive throughout Europe and the US pretty regularly) and the irony of it is the accident rate often increases when, as on the M5, speed limits are inappropriate because people spend their time staring at their speedometer to keep their vehicle at 49.9 rather than watching the car in front. This is particularly the case with HGVs which are geared for a cruising speed of either 56 or 62mph.
“Speed enforcement on this stretch of the M5 is necessary while roadworks are taking place," Of course it is not., this is all about raising revenue for the deluded fools at the "safety partnership" that perpetuate this myth. It is not contraflow, they have just moved the lanes over for a few miles so lane 1 is now the hard shoulder. The workers are safely protected by a long barrier. No other country in the world would impose such a limit for this type of work (I know that as I drive throughout Europe and the US pretty regularly) and the irony of it is the accident rate often increases when, as on the M5, speed limits are inappropriate because people spend their time staring at their speedometer to keep their vehicle at 49.9 rather than watching the car in front. This is particularly the case with HGVs which are geared for a cruising speed of either 56 or 62mph. AlexHanley
  • Score: 3

9:41am Wed 12 Mar 14

BadgerMash says...

I hope these cameras will be used to identify and prosecute drivers "tailgating" - threatening behaviour, using a vehicle as a weapon - this criminal behaviour kills and maims more than any other on motorways.
I hope these cameras will be used to identify and prosecute drivers "tailgating" - threatening behaviour, using a vehicle as a weapon - this criminal behaviour kills and maims more than any other on motorways. BadgerMash
  • Score: 3

10:28am Wed 12 Mar 14

Hanskrankel says...

Totally agree with the comments made by AlexHanley. The workers are protected by the steel barrier. Would be nice to get upto 50 mph some days! My big issue is with the so called 'Free Recovery' for broken down vehicles. The response time is ridiculously slow. Yesterday, two 'stranded' vehicles caused tailbacks from Junction 5 to Junction 3. Can the Highways Agency not get these vehicles removed quicker by having the recovery vehicles a bit closer to this stretch of motorway, or am I missing something? Yesterday afternoon was chaos again.
Totally agree with the comments made by AlexHanley. The workers are protected by the steel barrier. Would be nice to get upto 50 mph some days! My big issue is with the so called 'Free Recovery' for broken down vehicles. The response time is ridiculously slow. Yesterday, two 'stranded' vehicles caused tailbacks from Junction 5 to Junction 3. Can the Highways Agency not get these vehicles removed quicker by having the recovery vehicles a bit closer to this stretch of motorway, or am I missing something? Yesterday afternoon was chaos again. Hanskrankel
  • Score: 6

11:54am Wed 12 Mar 14

Hillbilly1 says...

Hanskrankel wrote:
Totally agree with the comments made by AlexHanley. The workers are protected by the steel barrier. Would be nice to get upto 50 mph some days! My big issue is with the so called 'Free Recovery' for broken down vehicles. The response time is ridiculously slow. Yesterday, two 'stranded' vehicles caused tailbacks from Junction 5 to Junction 3. Can the Highways Agency not get these vehicles removed quicker by having the recovery vehicles a bit closer to this stretch of motorway, or am I missing something? Yesterday afternoon was chaos again.
Ah yes, but how does the recovery vehicle get to the broken down vehicle? Without a hard shoulder, the recovery vehicle can only wait in the traffic queue with the rest of us.
[quote][p][bold]Hanskrankel[/bold] wrote: Totally agree with the comments made by AlexHanley. The workers are protected by the steel barrier. Would be nice to get upto 50 mph some days! My big issue is with the so called 'Free Recovery' for broken down vehicles. The response time is ridiculously slow. Yesterday, two 'stranded' vehicles caused tailbacks from Junction 5 to Junction 3. Can the Highways Agency not get these vehicles removed quicker by having the recovery vehicles a bit closer to this stretch of motorway, or am I missing something? Yesterday afternoon was chaos again.[/p][/quote]Ah yes, but how does the recovery vehicle get to the broken down vehicle? Without a hard shoulder, the recovery vehicle can only wait in the traffic queue with the rest of us. Hillbilly1
  • Score: 4

12:52pm Wed 12 Mar 14

thesquirrel says...

Has anyone ever actually received a fine from one of these average speed cameras? I often wonder whether they actually work.
Has anyone ever actually received a fine from one of these average speed cameras? I often wonder whether they actually work. thesquirrel
  • Score: 2

1:20pm Wed 12 Mar 14

Hillbilly1 says...

thesquirrel wrote:
Has anyone ever actually received a fine from one of these average speed cameras? I often wonder whether they actually work.
Oh yes they work, they're not just put there as a decoy. Of course, there's only one way to find out! But I don't recommend it.
[quote][p][bold]thesquirrel[/bold] wrote: Has anyone ever actually received a fine from one of these average speed cameras? I often wonder whether they actually work.[/p][/quote]Oh yes they work, they're not just put there as a decoy. Of course, there's only one way to find out! But I don't recommend it. Hillbilly1
  • Score: 0

7:21pm Wed 12 Mar 14

Brummagem Bertie says...

AlexHanley wrote:
“Speed enforcement on this stretch of the M5 is necessary while roadworks are taking place,"

Of course it is not., this is all about raising revenue for the deluded fools at the "safety partnership" that perpetuate this myth. It is not contraflow, they have just moved the lanes over for a few miles so lane 1 is now the hard shoulder. The workers are safely protected by a long barrier.

No other country in the world would impose such a limit for this type of work (I know that as I drive throughout Europe and the US pretty regularly) and the irony of it is the accident rate often increases when, as on the M5, speed limits are inappropriate because people spend their time staring at their speedometer to keep their vehicle at 49.9 rather than watching the car in front. This is particularly the case with HGVs which are geared for a cruising speed of either 56 or 62mph.
No, it is nothing to do with raising revenue and all to do with keeping roadworkers safe.

Whilst the long barrier does help, it is not complete protection, as this story from the Guardian on 1 November 2013 demonstrates, http://www.theguardi
an.com/uk-news/2013/
nov/01/m25-crash-lor
ry-driver-road-worke
rs

Briefly, a lorry overturned on a stretch of the M25, completely demolishing a similar barrier, injuring 3 roadworkers, one critically. That none of them were killed was down to nothing more than luck.

This article in the Telegraph in 2012, http://www.telegraph
.co.uk/motoring/road
-safety/9495761/Road
worker-safety-fears.
html , reported that in the years 2005-2011 11 road workers were killed on the motorways and trunk road for which the Highways Agency is responsible and 150 major injuries.

The Telegraph report contains some truly frightening examples of actual driver behaviour, some involving excessive speed.

If Europe and the US would not adopt similar measures, that might explain why we have a lower rate of workplace fatalities than pretty much all European countries and far lower than the US. As someone who has had to deal with a number of workplace fatalities I would urge you and others to think very carefully before dismissing safety measures designed to try to keep people safe at work as a revenue raising measure.
[quote][p][bold]AlexHanley[/bold] wrote: “Speed enforcement on this stretch of the M5 is necessary while roadworks are taking place," Of course it is not., this is all about raising revenue for the deluded fools at the "safety partnership" that perpetuate this myth. It is not contraflow, they have just moved the lanes over for a few miles so lane 1 is now the hard shoulder. The workers are safely protected by a long barrier. No other country in the world would impose such a limit for this type of work (I know that as I drive throughout Europe and the US pretty regularly) and the irony of it is the accident rate often increases when, as on the M5, speed limits are inappropriate because people spend their time staring at their speedometer to keep their vehicle at 49.9 rather than watching the car in front. This is particularly the case with HGVs which are geared for a cruising speed of either 56 or 62mph.[/p][/quote]No, it is nothing to do with raising revenue and all to do with keeping roadworkers safe. Whilst the long barrier does help, it is not complete protection, as this story from the Guardian on 1 November 2013 demonstrates, http://www.theguardi an.com/uk-news/2013/ nov/01/m25-crash-lor ry-driver-road-worke rs Briefly, a lorry overturned on a stretch of the M25, completely demolishing a similar barrier, injuring 3 roadworkers, one critically. That none of them were killed was down to nothing more than luck. This article in the Telegraph in 2012, http://www.telegraph .co.uk/motoring/road -safety/9495761/Road worker-safety-fears. html , reported that in the years 2005-2011 11 road workers were killed on the motorways and trunk road for which the Highways Agency is responsible and 150 major injuries. The Telegraph report contains some truly frightening examples of actual driver behaviour, some involving excessive speed. If Europe and the US would not adopt similar measures, that might explain why we have a lower rate of workplace fatalities than pretty much all European countries and far lower than the US. As someone who has had to deal with a number of workplace fatalities I would urge you and others to think very carefully before dismissing safety measures designed to try to keep people safe at work as a revenue raising measure. Brummagem Bertie
  • Score: 4

10:25pm Wed 12 Mar 14

DarrenM says...

maybe speeding fine revenue can go towards the millions of pounds of taxpayers money wasted on putting these pointless concrete barriers everywhere.

Its interesting that with all these police and council cutbacks, the speed camera partnership is still alive and kicking - what cutbacks have they experienced out of interest? considering Netting-off finished some time ago and the fines go to central government, how much does Rodney and his friend cost the local taxpayer?
maybe speeding fine revenue can go towards the millions of pounds of taxpayers money wasted on putting these pointless concrete barriers everywhere. Its interesting that with all these police and council cutbacks, the speed camera partnership is still alive and kicking - what cutbacks have they experienced out of interest? considering Netting-off finished some time ago and the fines go to central government, how much does Rodney and his friend cost the local taxpayer? DarrenM
  • Score: -3

11:56pm Wed 12 Mar 14

RobertR says...

Safety Partnership. Just a bunch of thieves posing as doing something for the public good. Nigerian based perhaps?. The sad thing is this idiot Anna Higgins thinks she's doing a good job.
Safety Partnership. Just a bunch of thieves posing as doing something for the public good. Nigerian based perhaps?. The sad thing is this idiot Anna Higgins thinks she's doing a good job. RobertR
  • Score: -7

11:58pm Wed 12 Mar 14

Brummagem Bertie says...

DarrenM wrote:
maybe speeding fine revenue can go towards the millions of pounds of taxpayers money wasted on putting these pointless concrete barriers everywhere.

Its interesting that with all these police and council cutbacks, the speed camera partnership is still alive and kicking - what cutbacks have they experienced out of interest? considering Netting-off finished some time ago and the fines go to central government, how much does Rodney and his friend cost the local taxpayer?
A quick search of the internet reveals that the Partnership is funded by the 4 Highways Authorities in the West Mercia area using grants from the Department of Transport. The cutbacks to Partnership funding are also a matter of record.

And what pointless concrete barriers would you be referring to? If to the concrete central reservations being fitted to the M5 there is a substantial body of evidence, accrued over many years, from the USA and across Europe that such barriers are safer, more robust, last longer and require considerably less maintenance than the "traditional" metal barriers.
[quote][p][bold]DarrenM[/bold] wrote: maybe speeding fine revenue can go towards the millions of pounds of taxpayers money wasted on putting these pointless concrete barriers everywhere. Its interesting that with all these police and council cutbacks, the speed camera partnership is still alive and kicking - what cutbacks have they experienced out of interest? considering Netting-off finished some time ago and the fines go to central government, how much does Rodney and his friend cost the local taxpayer?[/p][/quote]A quick search of the internet reveals that the Partnership is funded by the 4 Highways Authorities in the West Mercia area using grants from the Department of Transport. The cutbacks to Partnership funding are also a matter of record. And what pointless concrete barriers would you be referring to? If to the concrete central reservations being fitted to the M5 there is a substantial body of evidence, accrued over many years, from the USA and across Europe that such barriers are safer, more robust, last longer and require considerably less maintenance than the "traditional" metal barriers. Brummagem Bertie
  • Score: 4

3:19pm Thu 13 Mar 14

MrWXYZ says...

can the cameras fine motorists for driving in the incorrect lane as well please?
Since cameras were deployed in roadworks any 50mph stretch is awash with people doing 45 in random lanes but not overtaking.
can the cameras fine motorists for driving in the incorrect lane as well please? Since cameras were deployed in roadworks any 50mph stretch is awash with people doing 45 in random lanes but not overtaking. MrWXYZ
  • Score: 1

8:56pm Mon 17 Mar 14

Biggles says...

MrWXYZ wrote:
can the cameras fine motorists for driving in the incorrect lane as well please?
Since cameras were deployed in roadworks any 50mph stretch is awash with people doing 45 in random lanes but not overtaking.
You're "advised" not to change lanes !
[quote][p][bold]MrWXYZ[/bold] wrote: can the cameras fine motorists for driving in the incorrect lane as well please? Since cameras were deployed in roadworks any 50mph stretch is awash with people doing 45 in random lanes but not overtaking.[/p][/quote]You're "advised" not to change lanes ! Biggles
  • Score: -2

9:09am Tue 18 Mar 14

imustbeoldiwearacap says...

AlexHanley wrote:
“Speed enforcement on this stretch of the M5 is necessary while roadworks are taking place,"

Of course it is not., this is all about raising revenue for the deluded fools at the "safety partnership" that perpetuate this myth. It is not contraflow, they have just moved the lanes over for a few miles so lane 1 is now the hard shoulder. The workers are safely protected by a long barrier.

No other country in the world would impose such a limit for this type of work (I know that as I drive throughout Europe and the US pretty regularly) and the irony of it is the accident rate often increases when, as on the M5, speed limits are inappropriate because people spend their time staring at their speedometer to keep their vehicle at 49.9 rather than watching the car in front. This is particularly the case with HGVs which are geared for a cruising speed of either 56 or 62mph.
They have not "just moved the lanes over" they have made lane 3 narrower, lost the hard shoulder, lost the gap between the carriageway and the central reservation barrier! So drivers have much less "error" room! So reducing the speed limit is justified - and the speed cameras are a necessary evil. And having seen some "driving" on this section at times I rather think even 50 is too fast for some! I have to travel to Manchester often so I'm faced with this problem both on the M5 and M6 - but it has not made much difference to my journey time - but it has improved my fuel consumption!
[quote][p][bold]AlexHanley[/bold] wrote: “Speed enforcement on this stretch of the M5 is necessary while roadworks are taking place," Of course it is not., this is all about raising revenue for the deluded fools at the "safety partnership" that perpetuate this myth. It is not contraflow, they have just moved the lanes over for a few miles so lane 1 is now the hard shoulder. The workers are safely protected by a long barrier. No other country in the world would impose such a limit for this type of work (I know that as I drive throughout Europe and the US pretty regularly) and the irony of it is the accident rate often increases when, as on the M5, speed limits are inappropriate because people spend their time staring at their speedometer to keep their vehicle at 49.9 rather than watching the car in front. This is particularly the case with HGVs which are geared for a cruising speed of either 56 or 62mph.[/p][/quote]They have not "just moved the lanes over" they have made lane 3 narrower, lost the hard shoulder, lost the gap between the carriageway and the central reservation barrier! So drivers have much less "error" room! So reducing the speed limit is justified - and the speed cameras are a necessary evil. And having seen some "driving" on this section at times I rather think even 50 is too fast for some! I have to travel to Manchester often so I'm faced with this problem both on the M5 and M6 - but it has not made much difference to my journey time - but it has improved my fuel consumption! imustbeoldiwearacap
  • Score: 5

10:47am Tue 18 Mar 14

truth must out says...

MrWXYZ wrote:
can the cameras fine motorists for driving in the incorrect lane as well please?
Since cameras were deployed in roadworks any 50mph stretch is awash with people doing 45 in random lanes but not overtaking.
50 is the limit NOT the target.....
[quote][p][bold]MrWXYZ[/bold] wrote: can the cameras fine motorists for driving in the incorrect lane as well please? Since cameras were deployed in roadworks any 50mph stretch is awash with people doing 45 in random lanes but not overtaking.[/p][/quote]50 is the limit NOT the target..... truth must out
  • Score: -2

3:44pm Tue 18 Mar 14

MrWXYZ says...

This is the case on some sections Biggles - i have seen on the m42 variable limits and is usually on temporary limits for an accident/heavy traffic to stop lane changing making things worse. But didnt think i had seen signs on the m5 section.

'Truth must out' who said it was the target? But driving in the outer lanes when not overtaking is against the law unless advised to stay in lane. And doing so when driving below the speed limit would cause unnecesary problems to people driving within the law.
This is the case on some sections Biggles - i have seen on the m42 variable limits and is usually on temporary limits for an accident/heavy traffic to stop lane changing making things worse. But didnt think i had seen signs on the m5 section. 'Truth must out' who said it was the target? But driving in the outer lanes when not overtaking is against the law unless advised to stay in lane. And doing so when driving below the speed limit would cause unnecesary problems to people driving within the law. MrWXYZ
  • Score: 3

11:57pm Tue 18 Mar 14

Old Uncle says...

To clarify/rebut. In a number of states in the US there is a 45 mph limit in construction zones to protect the workers. The cameras take pictures and send the vehicle owner the ticket in the post .
To clarify/rebut. In a number of states in the US there is a 45 mph limit in construction zones to protect the workers. The cameras take pictures and send the vehicle owner the ticket in the post . Old Uncle
  • Score: 0

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