Wife fears for husband’s recovery as funds are cut

Wife fears for husband’s recovery as funds are cut

3214668101 Paul Jackson 05.08.14 Moreton-in-Marsh - Wendy and Kim Farrell who use the Acquired Brain Injury Education Service in Evesham. They are worried about the classes now that funding for two occupational therapists has been withdrawn. (8972509)

3214668102 Paul Jackson 05.08.14 Moreton-in-Marsh - Wendy and Kim Farrell who use the Acquired Brain Injury Education Service in Evesham. They are worried about the classes now that funding for two occupational therapists has been withdrawn. (8972511)

First published in News by

A WOMAN whose husband suffered a massive stroke three years ago fears funding cuts to a vital service for brain injury patients could seriously effect his rehabilitation.

Wendy Farrell, of Blenheim Way, Moreton, said the Acquired Brain Injury Education Service (ABIES), based at South Worcestershire College, in Evesham, has been a lifeline to her husband Kim since his stroke in 2011.

Mr Farrell, aged 51, who still suffers seizures, aphasia and has cognitive problems, has been using the centre in Davies Road for two years and finds it invaluable.

The college offers a varied timetable of educational programmes specifically designed for ABI students along with advice and support.

But his wife, 46, said the centre is set to lose its two occupational therapists and the head of services after the Acquired Aphasia Trust - which owns and is responsible for the Acquired Brain Injury Centre - withdrew funding.

She said while the volunteers there do a fantastic job, she was worried students will not be supported by specialists in brain injuries.

"There are worries about how the students are going to be understood," she said. "I just find it really hard to understand how it will run without occupational therapist support with the experience of people that know brain injuries, that's a big worry."

Mrs Farrell said they were delighted to find the Evesham college after being turned away from centres in Cheltenham and Tewkesbury as they are not local.

"It's just helped him so much," she said. "When I leave him there in the mornings, I was more than happy he was going to be happy there all day.

"It was absolute lifeline for him as well. He's done IT, learnt how to deal with a brain injury and all these classes like art. It's just fabulous. It's such a shame."

The news is a further blow to the college which used to open four days a week but now is only open three after the government made 20 per cent cuts to adult services.

Viv Gillespie, principle of South Worcestershire College, said: "The Acquired Aphasia Trust and South Worcestershire College are working together to solve some short-term issues in order to ensure a continuing offer for students who attend the Acquired Brain Injury Service in the county.

"From September 2014, varied provision will run from the ABI Centre in Evesham for part of the week."

The Acquired Aphasia Trust was unavailable for comment by the time The Journal went to press.

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